By Sam Flynn

In April last year, we launched www.mykifines.org.au. The website was part of a project which sought to pressure the Victorian government to reform its inequitable and unfair public transport infringement regime. In particular, our aim was to inform people of their rights, and to empower them to make an informed and considered decision when faced with the prospect of an on-the-spot penalty fare.

On launch day, the website was covered by ABC Melbourne (774), 3AW, Triple R, The Age, Broadsheet, Junkee, Pedestrian, ABC regional radio, Channel 9 News and many others. This led more than 35,000 visitors to the website on its first day. Since its launch, the website has had more than 73,000 unique visitors. And, a little over a month after the launch, the Victorian government announced sweeping changes to the public transport infringement regime.

Some of these changes were directed at making it easier to obtain a valid ticket, such as by making online top ups available in 90 minutes and installing louder beeps and anti-glare screens on myki readers and top-up machines. Others were directed at making the infringement system itself fairer, such as by removing on-the-spot penalty fares, giving better training to authorised officers and allowing the Department of Transport to exercise greater leniency and discretion when someone is found without have a valid ticket.

While we welcome these changes, the infringement process remains confusing. We know this because we still get weekly emails from people confused about their rights when faced with a myki fine. This means www.mykifines.org.au must be updated if it is going to continue to help people to navigate this system. We have secured a grant from the Victoria Law Foundation to help us to relaunch Myki Fines, but we still need another $2,000 to complete the project.

That’s where you come in: Can you Chip in to help us update Myki Fines?